Optic neuritis

Optic neuritis

Optic neuritis is inflammation of the optic nerve.

Optic neuritis is inflammation of the optic nerve. It may cause sudden, reduced vision in the affected eye. The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. Sudden inflammation of this nerve can cause the optic nerve to swell. This can result in injury to the nerve fibers and some or permanent loss of vision. Conditions that have been linked with optic neuritis include: autoimmune diseases, including lupus, sarcoidosis, Behcet’s disease, and more. Symptoms include loss of vision in one eye over an hour or a few hours, changes in the way the pupil reacts to bright light, loss of color vision, and pain when you move the eye. Vision often returns to normal within 2 to 3 weeks with no treatment. People who have optic neuritis without a disease such as multiple sclerosis have a good chance of recovery.

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Patricia Barber
Patricia Barber
For the last 20 years, Pat has been helping patients and caregivers live better lives, advocate for change, and Virginia's "right hand" making sure the "i's" are dotted and the "t's" are crossed. She lives in Michigan and couldn't picture herself doing anything but helping the autoimmune community.

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