Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis)

Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis)

Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis) is a disorder that causes inflammation of arteries of the scalp, neck, and arms.

Giant cell arteritis (temporal arteritis) is a disorder that causes inflammation of arteries of the scalp, neck, and arms. It narrows the arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another autoimmune disorder called polymyalgia rheumatica. Both are more common in women than in men and almost always affect people over the age of 50. Early symptoms of giant cell arteritis resemble the flu: fatigue, loss of appetite, and fever. Other symptoms include headaches, pain and tenderness over the temples, double vision or visual loss, dizziness, problems with coordination and balance, as well as pain in your jaw and tongue.

 

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Patricia Barber
Patricia Barber
For the last 20 years, Pat has been helping patients and caregivers live better lives, advocate for change, and Virginia's "right hand" making sure the "i's" are dotted and the "t's" are crossed. She lives in Michigan and couldn't picture herself doing anything but helping the autoimmune community.

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